How Do You State Your “Compelling Reasons?”

by on January 16, 2013

How Do You State Your “Compelling Reasons?”

There is no escaping that we live in a fast paced society.  We tend to receive information in quick sound bites, whether it is via television, the radio, the internet, or even now on our electronic devices.  On average, those messages that we receive come to us in 10 to 15 second sound bite intervals at best.  This reality is not only true when we’re the receiver of the message, but when we want others to pay attention to the messages we are delivering.  That can be a real challenge when we want to make sure our message is connecting with our listener or reader.

I was reminded of this in a recent conversation with a business acquaintance.  He was stressing to me that when he listens to other business owners that he may choose to refer to his friends or clients, he listens for those one or two compelling reasons to refer that individual.  Additionally, he also looks to make sure when asking others to refer him that he spells out the compelling reasons they should do so.  For example, my acquaintance owns an insurance agency for a major company.  When referring him, he asks others to stress that he “provides great claims advice and service, he’ll fix your coverages and save you money.” That’s it, plain and simple.  His goal is that a perspective client will hear in that something which is important to them.  He then has the accountability to make his case when that individual gets in front of him.  He realizes that if others refer him by providing long winded or flowery explanations, most people’s attention spans will not allow for that, and they are already moving on to that next thought or activity in their life.

Compelling reasons are for more than just entrepreneurial business owners.  They are a key component for everyone.  For the job searcher, their intent should be to get in front of a perspective hiring manager.  To do so, they need a resume’ that highlights the main items that will display they are a match for the job.  That document should be emphasizing the one or two major skill sets that the job requires, or an accomplishment that will stand out to the one doing the interviewing, (for example, saved my employer several million dollars on a project I implemented).  Or the job searcher, in their first ten to fifteen seconds in a face to face situation should be able to state who they are, what they do, and a point as to why they would be a great candidate for any perspective employer.   In interacting with your family, compelling reasons could help explain why the family should go to a particular location for summer vacation or why obtaining certain standards in school studies is essential for getting into that next course of study or profession your child seeks.  No matter the communication type, business or personal, with someone you know or someone you are meeting for the first time, getting that message on point is important if gaining and attracting their attention is what you desire.

The most difficult part in developing compelling reasons for many is getting them down to those ten or fifteen second messages.  For example, I as a coach can provide one all sort of long explanations as to why one should work with me.  However, if all I do is examine the clients that have worked with and have stayed with me, the fundamental reason they have is they feel better about their lives and themselves by applying the concepts to which I introduce them.  Another reason many give is “I would have never dealt with what happened the way I did, until I began to work with you.”

None of us is going to change the pace of how society moves around us.  So, we’re all going to have to learn ways to get our message across to those with whom we want to connect.  Determining those one or two compelling reasons why our listener will be inspired to learn more about us and what we have to offer is the place to start.

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